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Showing posts from July, 2021

Dan Tanna 57 T-Bird from the TV Show Vega$ starring Robert Urich

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American collector-car enthusiasts coming of age in the last 30-40 years view the '57 Thunderbird as a star among collector cars. This is in no small part due to the sheer number of times these iconic machines have appeared on TV and the silver screen. The International Movie Cars Database lists more than two dozen visual references to the '57. That number nearly quadruples if you count the '55-'56 edition. (One of which was, of course, the '56 T-Bird that a sultry Suzanne Somers drove Richard Dreyfuss's character nuts with in American Graffiti). The most exposed '57 might be the car that Robert Urich drove as private investigator Dan Tanna in TV's Vega$. So what does this have to do with the value of one of the most recognizable of Dearborn's products? Hard to say, but the staying power of the T-Bird in pop culture probably had some influence on the steady rise we've seen from a low of about $7,500 for a scruffy driver when Vega$ aired its secon

Lattig, Derik - Our (DNA) List: Stories about Cat DNA, Health and Development

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  Next to teenagers,  cats  are the most mercurial companions. Sometimes they are sweet and cuddly wanting nothing but scratches and love. Other times they attack everything in sight, assaulting feathers, batting at sweater sleeves, or swatting coasters and cups and even house plants right off the counter. While the behavior can be entertaining, occasionally owners who have just watched their pet push a beloved vase off a shelf may be wondering why, why, good grief, why? Well,  according to  Daily Paws , curiosity may not only kill the cat, but it can cost you a houseplant or vase or two.  As the adage implies, cats are curious creatures and it's that curiosity that drives them to push things around, just to see if they can do it. That innate curiosity isn't the only thing driving your cat to send your wedding china crashing to the floor, though. Per the  Daily Paws , there are a few main reasons cats like testing gravity. First, your cat just might be feeling frisky. If they d

Our DNA List Derik Lattig-Stories by Derik Lattig about Cat Health and DNA

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  Personalized medicine for cats with heart disease Study finds genetic makeup influences response to common feline heart disease medication Date: July 6, 2021 Source: University of California - Davis Summary: Veterinarians at the University of California, Davis, have found that a cat's DNA alters how it responds to a life-saving medication used to treat hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or HCM, a heart disease that affects 1 in 7 cats. Veterinarians at the University of California, Davis, have found that a cat's DNA alters how it responds to a life-saving medication used to treat hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or HCM, a heart disease that affects 1 in 7 cats. The study was published in the Nature Portfolio journal,  Scientific Reports . HCM causes a cat's heart muscle to thicken. As the condition worsens, cats can form blood clots in their hearts that may later dislodge and cause extreme pain, distress and even sudden death. Clopidogrel, or Plavix®, is one of the most commonly pr

Cat (DNA) by Derik Lattig

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  A cat’s DNA alters how it responds to a life-saving medication used to treat hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, researchers report. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a heart  disease  that affects 1 in 7 cats. “JUST AS WE CAN’T EXPECT EVERY HUMAN TO RESPOND TO MEDICATION IN THE SAME WAY, WE CAN’T EXPECT ALL CATS TO RESPOND THE SAME WAY EITHER.” HCM causes a cat’s heart muscle to  thicken . As the condition worsens, cats can form blood clots in their  hearts  that may later dislodge and cause extreme pain, distress, and even sudden death. Clopidogrel, or Plavix, is one of the most commonly prescribed medications used to prevent blood clots in cats with HCM. “We were consistently seeing cats that despite being on clopidogrel, were still forming blood clots,” says corresponding author Josh Stern, professor of veterinary cardiology and geneticist with the University of California, Davis School of Veterinary Medicine. This led Stern and the research team to begin research in this area and id